Turn unsuitable soil into a rich, growing medium

Turn unsuitable soil into a rich, growing medium

Garden soil, also known as loam soil, ideally comprises a balanced blend of clay, sand, and silt. Excessive clay content can lead to water pooling, posing a threat to plants, worms, and beneficial microorganisms. On the other hand, insufficient clay may result in water quickly passing through the soil, preventing plants from absorbing essential nutrients.
The objective when amending clay soil is to enhance the particle size, promoting proper water drainage, facilitating oxygen penetration into the soil, and ensuring the availability of nutrients for plant uptake. Here's a guide on amending clay soil to create an environment suitable for the growth of various plant types.
Grow Plants. Clay soil is relatively life-free, so to aerate your soil, add life to it. Organic matter is the leaven of soil, creating air pockets like yeast does in bread. Plants that are good at breaking up clay include those with deep tap roots, like daikon radishes, and those with fibrous root systems like rye or clover. When the plants die, their organic matter creates a natural compost that allows water to drain through.
Accelerate plant growth by incorporating compost. Compost, the result of organic matter breakdown by bacteria and worms (vermicomposting), provides readily available nutrients for root absorption. You can easily obtain compost or composted cow manure from garden centers. Simply apply it as a mulch on top of the soil. In regions with freezing temperatures, the natural freeze-thaw cycle will integrate the compost into the soil. In non-freezing regions, rainfall will gradually leach the nutrients into the soil.
If compost isn't available or is too costly, add a mulch of other types of organic matter, such as leaf litter, pine needles, lawn clippings, straw or hay from local farms, or untreated wood chips.
Adding worms will accelerate the decomposition of organic matter in the soil. Worms tunnel through your soil and naturally aerate it, while the excretions they leave behind is their own way of composting your soil.
Follow OtaraPack to get more sustainable molded pulp packaging solution:
https://www.instagram.com/otarapack
https://www.facebook.com/otarapack
https://www.pinterest.com/OtaraPack
Back to blog