Decoding Molding Pulp Characteristics of Diverse Materials

Decoding Molding Pulp Characteristics of Diverse Materials

The production process of pulp molding products relies heavily on a variety of raw materials. In addition to the commonly used materials like sugarcane pulp, bamboo pulp, and waste paper pulp, there are niche options like chemical pulp, palm pulp, and others. This article aims to organize and summarize the characteristics and applications of these materials.
Pulp molding products, known for their environmentally friendly attributes, encompass a range of raw materials. These materials include bagasse pulp, bamboo pulp, straw pulp, reed pulp, and more. But what sets them apart? Let's explore:
Characteristics of Various Raw Materials in Molding Pulp
1.Bamboo Pulp
    Bamboo pulp, used in molding pulp products, boasts medium-length fibers, offering a balance between coniferous and broadleaf wood. This material results in products with a smooth and delicate surface, though it can sometimes exhibit fluffy fibers, especially in complex product shapes. It finds common use alongside sugarcane fiber for crafting tableware.
    2.Sugarcane Pulp
      Sugarcane pulp is derived from bagasse through chemical or biological pulping processes. With moderate strength and toughness, sugarcane fibers are highly suitable for molding pulp products. OTARApack offers a variety of Sugarcane Pulp packaging. Currently, they are widely employed in lunchbox tableware production, and some premium mobile phone trays and cosmetic packaging also utilize this raw material.
      3.Wheat Straw Pulp
        Wheat straw pulp for pulp molding products can be categorized into mechanical fiber-based, chemical-mechanical, and chemical types. Wheat straw pulp fibers are short but possess good stiffness, resulting in brittle products with limited flexibility. The production process typically involves neutralizing long fibers to enhance product toughness. Wheat straw pulp is mainly used for coffee trays, dry-pressed items, and even bleached or natural-colored straw fiber for lunchbox and tableware production. It's also used in making paper nursery trays, fruit trays, and seedling trays.
        4.Wood Pulp
          Wood pulp is the raw material for pulp molding products, primarily used in manufacturing high-end industrial bags. This material can be further divided into coniferous and broadleaf pulp. Coniferous pulp features long, fine fibers, resulting in pure and impurity-free pulp, offering high flexibility and tensile strength. On the other hand, the broadleaf pulp has thicker, shorter fibers and more impurities, resulting in less strong but absorbent and opaque products. Poplar pulp and eucalyptus pulp are also used for crafting tableware, premium egg trays, and high-end coffee trays.
          5.Reed Pulp
            Reed pulp is mainly used in papermaking, molding products are primarily used in low-grade products, reed pulp in the production process is not easy to remove the reed knots, more impurities, and whiteness is lower, but the price is low, the water filtration is better, because of the fiber fluffy, so the exact grams of finished product thickness is thicker, occupying a larger space.
            6.Palm Pulp
              Palm pulp is derived from palm fruit and leaf fibers. Although relatively rare, it is used in pulp molding products, especially when the palm oil content is high and removal is challenging. This material offers good stiffness.
              7.Cotton Stalk Pulp
                Cotton stalk pulp for molded pulp products uses only cotton stalks. After removing the surface layer, intermediate tissue is utilized for production. The resulting fiber is fluffy and has poor stiffness, making it suitable mainly for low-grade paper.
                 
                8.Melon Vine and Hemp Cotton Pulp
                  Melon vine and hemp cotton pulp are generalized terms, covering various melon plant species used for pulp molding products. However, these fibers are typically short and challenging to process due to their stiffness and impurities, limiting their widespread use.
                  9.Agricultural and Forestry Waste
                    The production of machine-molded fiber products from agricultural and forestry waste involves mechanical force dispersion of plant fiber raw materials through grinding. This method, known as mechanical pulping, retains lignin and cellulose and results in weaker fiber bonding. When using machine-molded fiber, chemical machine pulp or chemical pulp should not exceed 50%, as higher proportions can lead to product breakage.
                    10.Ordinary Waste Paper
                      Ordinary waste paper, such as yellow pulp from cartons, newspaper pulp, and A4 paper pulp, is used in molding products with low hygiene and cost requirements. Common applications include egg trays, fruit trays, and protective packaging.
                      11.Chemical-Mechanical Pulp
                        Chemical-mechanical pulp undergoes chemical treatment before grinding, containing higher lignin and cellulose components, and lower hemicellulose components. This type of pulp is typically used for mid-range molding products, with costs falling between mechanical and chemical pulps. Its bleaching, hydration, and water filtration properties closely resemble mechanical pulp.
                        Final words
                        In this journey towards greener and more sustainable practices, understanding the nuances of each raw material empowers us to make informed decisions. Whether it's harnessing the strength of sugarcane or the resilience of bamboo, these materials pave the way for a future where pulp moulding contributes to a cleaner, more environmentally conscious world.
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